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Time Capsule Discovery

Time capsule

As building work on our building project nears completion ready for its Spring 2021 opening, our builders have made an astonishing discovery of a time capsule hidden in the historic synagogue’s walls.

The glass jar, complete with its wax seal intact, was discovered by a builder hidden deep in a wall cavern next to the Museum’s Ark (the holy cupboard which houses the Torah Scrolls).  Filled with money, synagogue papers and newspapers, these original artefacts are dated from around the time when the synagogue was first founded in 1873. Early synagogue minutes show records of the capsule being laid in the cornerstone of the original building.

Our CEO Max Dunbar said, “This timely discovery comes at an apt and symbolic time when millions of Jewish people around the world prepare for the holiest day of the Jewish calendar, the Day of Atonement, a reflective and thoughtful time of year when many observers look backwards as a means to move forwards.  We are thrilled and overwhelmed by its discovery and look forwards to showing it off in our collection when we re-open next Spring.”

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Manchester Jewish Museum pays tribute to the Queen

We were deeply saddened by the recent news about the death of Queen Elizabeth II. She was a constant in the lives of many in our community and will be missed and remembered by them. We offer our dearest condolences to the Royal Family. Our thoughts are with them now.

Synagogue Nights 2022. MJM once again launches the autumn season of evening performances in the historic former synagogue.

Manchester Jewish Museum will once again be celebrating Jewish music and art with the new season of Synagogue Nights: intimate performances in the 1874 Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue. From the mellow sounds of jazz and entertaining comedy shows to the greatest of classical hits, this season’s line-up celebrates diverse identities within the Jewish community.

Stencl and the Jewish East End – interview with Dr Rachel Lichtenstein

This September, we will be exploring one of Britain's foremost, but now largely forgotten Yiddish poets, Avram Nachum Stencl. The evening event will be hosted by Dr Rachel Lichtenstein, whose grandparents were Polish Jews and who, like Stencl, settled in East London in the 1930s after escaping Nazi persecution. We speak to Rachel about her interest in Stencl's story and works.